Don’t be bound by Binded.com

The copyright world is abuzz about a new copyright registration service at Binded.com. But don’t be fooled — there’s a reason that Binded can claim:

What used to take 20 minutes on copyright.gov, takes 9 seconds on Binded.

That’s because Binded doesn’t make sure that it’s registering your copyright correctly.

Most important, Binded never asks whether you are registering “published” photographs, and, if so, when and where they were first published. Binded doesn’t warn you that a published photos can registered as a group only if they were published within the same calendar year.

In its FAQ, Binded states: “If you’ve already published your image you still benefit by having a copyright record and our monitoring feature.” Binded doesn’t explain that using its service will not give you a valid copyright registration. You don’t need Binded to give you “proof of creation.” Other companies offer an image search for free, so you don’t need Binded’s “monitoring.”

Even if you’re registering unpublished photos, Binded doesn’t ask for the year of completion (the year that you took the most recent photograph of the group of photos being registered). While Binded maybe able to derive the year by the metadata of the photos, that’s not always correct.

Binded also doesn’t ask what is your nation of citizenship or domicile, which is required by the US Copyright Office. While Binded may make a guess from your address, that’s not always the same. Binded reveals towards the bottom of its FAQ page that its service is not for “work for hire” or collaborative works. It’s not for derivative works, either.

Binded apparently has plans to try to collect damages for infringement of your photos. It warns that it can change its terms of service at any time, so it may try to lock you into using its infringement services.

Note that once you use Binded’s service, your photos will forever be on the bitcoin blockchain.

Registering using the eCO sysem is not difficult or lengthy (especially for unpublished photos) and there are good articles on how to do it. It can be done quickly especially after you create a template for your registrations.

The first thing that an infringer will do is to attempt to invalidate your registration. You might as well keep your $$$ and save your time before registering your copyrights incorrectly.

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